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Nepal

Kathmandu to Pokhara Package | 6 nights 7 days | Tour Cost, Map, Itinerary

Duration

(7 Days)

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Nepal is a land of unparalleled scenic beauty and one of the most diverse geographical regions on earth. It contains an incredible variety of terrain in a relatively small area, ranging from the tropical lowlands of the “Terai” at about 300 ft above sea level to the summit of Mt. Everest at 29,035 ft (8850m)! What adds an even more interesting dimension to Nepal is the fact that its friendly people are from over 130 different ethnic groups! 

There are few countries in the world that are as well set up for independent travel as Nepal. Wandering the trekking shops, bakeries, and pizzerias of Kathmandu's tourist hub, Thamel and Pokhara, its s easy to feel that you have somehow landed in a kind of backpacker Disneyland. Out in the countryside lies a quite different Nepal, where traditional mountain life continues at a slower pace, and a million potential adventures glimmer on the mountain horizons. The biggest problem you might face in Nepal is just how to fit everything in, which is one reason why many people return here over and over again.

Kathmandu – Pokhara 5 nights 6 days tour program is specially designed to provide you with the very best taste of Nepal within a relatively short period of time and at the same time provide you with the opportunity to cover most of the sights and sounds of this intriguing country. Initially starting the trip with exploring Kathmandu valley's major attractions, the tour then moves on to the beautiful lakeside town of Pokhara

Book Now: Nepal Highlights Tour 13 Days | Pokhara | Lumbini | Bandipur | Chitwan (Cost, Route, and Map)

 Stretched along the shores of Phewa Lake and dotted with colorful bobbing paddle boats, Pokhara in fact is a little slice of tranquility. There are a number of epic things to do in Pokhara, especially for those chasing adrenalin, with white water rafting and some of the best paragliding on earth all available here.  From this lakeside town, there are majestic views of 8,000 meter-high snow-capped giants of the Annapurna range, awe-inspiring in their size and stature. On a clear day, they can be seen from everywhere in Pokhara like watchful guardians over the sleepy town. We can actually head to the lakeside early in the morning to breathe in the calm morning air and admire the towering peaks rising amongst the clouds in the distance.

Itinerary

This itinerary is a guideline only and we will follow the itinerary as far as possible but due to weather conditions, health conditions, natural disasters and other unfavorable phenomenon your guide might decide to amend or skip the itinerary for your own safety. Your guide will help you at any time with providing indesc-wrapion regarding conditions and safety during the trek.

Upon your arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, one of our team representatives will be at the airport to pick you up, and he will then take you to your hotel. 

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  1. Kathmandu Durbar Square:
  2. Swayambhunath:
  3. Boudhanath:
  4. Pashupatinath:
  • Welcome dinner in the evening hosted in your honor by the Asian Heritage team

Read more:

a) Kathmandu Durbar Square:

Kathmandu’s Durbar Sq was where the city’s kings were once crowned and legitimized, and from where they ruled (Durbar means palace). As such, the square remains the traditional heart of the old town and Kathmandu’s most spectacular legacy of traditional architecture. The square bore the brunt of Kathmandu's 2015 earthquake damage. Half a dozen temples collapsed, as did several towers in the Hanuman Dhoka palace complex, but it's still a fabulous complex. Reconstruction will continue for years.

Although most of the square dates from the 17th and 18th centuries (many of the original buildings are much older), a great deal of rebuilding happened after the great earthquake of 1934. The entire square was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1979.

The Durbar Sq area is actually made up of three loosely linked squares. To the south is the open Basantapur Sq area, a former royal elephant stables that now houses souvenir stalls and off which runs Freak St. The main Durbar Sq area is to the west. Running northeast is the second part of Durbar Sq, which contains the entrance to the Hanuman Dhoka and an assortment of temples. From this open area Makhan Tole, at one time the main road in Kathmandu and still the most interesting street to walk down, continues northeast.

b)            Swayambhunath:

The Swayambhunath Stupa is one of the crowning glories of Kathmandu Valley architecture. This perfectly proportioned monument rises through a whitewashed dome to a gilded spire, from where four iconic faces of the Buddha stare out across the valley in the cardinal directions. The site was shaken severely by the 2015 earthquake, but the main stupa sustained only superficial damage. The entire structure of the stupa is deeply symbolic: the white dome represents the earth, while the 13-tiered, tower-like structure at the top symbolizes the 13 stages of nirvana. The nose-like squiggle below the piercing eyes is actually the Nepali number Ek (one), signifying unity, and above is a third eye signifying the all-seeing insight of the Buddha.

The base of the central stupa is ringed by prayer wheels embossed with the sacred mantra om mani Padme hum (‘hail to the jewel in the lotus).

Pilgrims circuiting the stupa spin each one as they pass by. Fluttering above the stupa are thousands of prayer flags, with similar mantras, which are said to be carried to heaven by the Wind Horse. Set on ornate plinths around the base of the stupa are statues representing the five Dhyani Buddhas – Vairocana, Ratnasambhava, Amitabha, Amoghasiddhi, and Aksobhya – and their consorts. These deities represent the five qualities of Buddhist wisdom.

A journey up to the Buddhist temple and Unesco World Heritage Site of Swayambhunath is one of the definitive experiences of Kathmandu. Mobbed by monkeys and soaring above the city on a lofty hilltop, the ‘Monkey Temple’ is a fascinating jumble of Buddhist and Hindu iconography. Even the 2015 earthquake failed to topple Kathmandu's best-loved temple, though a couple of outlying buildings crumbled in the tremor.

The compound is centered on the gleaming white stupa, topped by a gilded spire painted with the eyes of the Buddha. Depictions of these eyes appear all over the Kathmandu Valley. The atmosphere is heightened in the morning and evening by local devotees who make a ritual circumnavigation of the stupa, spinning the prayer wheels set into its base. It is also a great place to watch the sunset over Kathmandu.

c)            Boudhanath:

The first stupa at Boudhanath was built sometime after AD 600, when the Tibetan king, Songtsen Gampo, converted to Buddhism. In terms of grace and purity of line, no other stupa in Nepal comes close to Boudhanath. From its whitewashed dome to its gilded tower painted with the all-seeing eyes of the Buddha, the monument is perfectly proportioned. Join the Tibetan pilgrims on their morning and evening koras (circumambulations) for the best atmosphere. According to legend, the king constructed the stupa as an act of penance after unwittingly killing his father. The first stupa was wrecked by Mughal invaders in the 14th century, so the current stupa is a more recent construction. The highly symbolic construction serves in essence as a three-dimensional reminder of the Buddha’s path towards enlightenment. The plinth represents earth, the Kumbha (dome) is water, the harmika (square tower) is fire, the spire is air and the umbrella at the top is the void or ether beyond space. The 13 levels of the spire represent the stages that a human being must pass through to achieve nirvana.

Stupas were originally built to house holy relics and some claim that Boudhanath contains the relics of the past Buddha, Kashyapa, while others say it contains a piece of bone from the skeleton of Siddhartha Gautama, the historical Buddha. Around the base of the stupa are 108 small images of the Dhyani Buddha Amitabha (108 is an auspicious number in Tibetan culture) and a ring of prayer wheels, set in groups of four or five into 147 niches.

To reach the upper level of the plinth, look for the gateway at the north end of the stupa, beside a small shrine dedicated to Hariti (Ajima), the goddess of smallpox. The plinth is open from 5 am to 6 pm (till 7 pm in summer), offering a raised viewpoint over the tide of pilgrims surging around the stupa. Note the committed devotees prostrating themselves full-length on the ground in the courtyard on the east side of the stupa.

d)            Pashupatinath:

Nepal’s most important Hindu temple stands on the banks of the holy Bagmati River, surrounded by a bustling market of religious stalls selling marigolds, prasad (offerings), incense, rudraksha beads, conch shells, pictures of Hindu deities and temples, tika powder in rainbow colors, glass lingams, models of Mt Meru and other essential pilgrim paraphernalia.

At first glance, Pashupatinath might not look that sacred – the temple is just a few hundred meters from the end of the runway at Tribhuvan Airport, overlooking a particularly polluted stretch of the Bagmati. However, in religious terms, this is a powerhouse of Hindu spiritual energy and is closely connected to Shiva in the form of Pashupati, the Lord of Animals. Some surrounding minor shrines were damaged in the 2015 earthquake, but the main mandir (temple) was unscathed.

After touring Pashupatinath we will then return back to the hotel and refresh ourselves before heading for a welcome dinner in the evening hosted in your honor by Asian Heritage Trekking.

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Today, we will set off for a full day of sightseeing of Patan, Bhaktapur, and Changunarayan.

Patan:

Once a fiercely independent city-state, Patan (pah-tan) is now almost a suburb of Kathmandu, separated only by the murky Bagmati River. Many locals still call the city by its original Sanskrit name of Lalitpur (City of Beauty) or by its Newari name, Yala. Almost everyone who comes to Kathmandu also visits Patan’s spectacular Durbar Sq – even after the 2015 earthquake, this remains the finest collection of temples and palaces in the whole of Nepal.

 Another good reason to come here is to take advantage of the shops and restaurants set up to cater to the NGO workers and diplomats who live in the surrounding suburbs. Then there are Patan’s fair-trade shops, selling superior handicrafts at fair prices and channeling tourist dollars to some of the neediest people in Nepal.

The ancient royal palace of Patan faces on to magnificent Durbar Sq. This concentrated mass of temples is perhaps the most visually stunning display of Newari architecture to be seen in Nepal. Temple construction in the square went into overdrive during the Malla period (14th to 18th centuries), particularly during the reign of King Siddhinarsingh Malla (1619–60). It's well worth at least a half-day trip from Kathmandu.

Reconstruction of temples affected by the 2015 earthquake will continue for several years, so safety fencing and scaffolding are to be expected. However, all restorations are well underway and the Royal Palace housing the museum is open.

Formerly the residence of the Malla kings, the section of the Royal Palace surrounding Keshav Narayan Chowk now houses one of the finest collections of religious art in Asia. The museum is a national treasure and an invaluable introduction to the art, symbolism, and architecture of the valley. You need at least an hour, and preferably two, to do this place justice, and it’s worth taking a break at the Museum Café before diving in for another round.

The collection is displayed in a series of brick and timber rooms, linked by steep and narrow stairways. There are informative labels on each of the hundreds of statues, carvings, and votive objects, allowing you to put a name to many of the deities depicted at temples around the valley.

There are also some interesting displays on the techniques used to create these wonderful objects, including the art of repoussé and the ‘lost wax method of casting. The top floor houses some fascinating photos of Patan at the end of the 19th century.

The museum has a shop selling reproductions of some of the works displayed inside. For a sneak preview of the museum’s highlights and the story of its renovation, go to www.asianart.com/patan-museum. Photography is allowed.

The other attractions that you will visit today in Patan include Golden Temple (Kwa Bahal), Mul Chowk, Krishna Mandir, Sundari Chowk, Royal palace, Golden Gate, and Maha Boudha Temple.

Must-see attractions in Patan

  • Patan Durbar Square:

 The ancient royal palace of Patan faces on to magnificent Durbar Sq. This concentrated mass of temples is perhaps the most visually stunning display of Newari architecture to be seen in Nepal. Temple construction in the square went into overdrive during the Malla period (14th to 18th centuries), particularly during the reign of King Siddhinarsingh Malla (1619–60). It's well worth at least a half-day trip from Kathmandu.

Reconstruction of temples affected by the 2015 earthquake will continue for several years, so safety fencing and scaffolding are to be expected. However, all restorations are well underway and the Royal Palace housing the museum is open.

  • Golden Temple (Kwa Bahal):

This unique Buddhist monastery is just north of Durbar Sq. It was allegedly founded in the 12th century, and it has existed in its current form since 1409. The temple gets its name from the gilded metal plates that cover most of its frontage and it is one of the most beautiful in Patan. 

Entry is via an ornate narrow stone doorway to the east, or a wooden doorway to the west from one of the interlinked courtyards on the north side of Nakabhil.

Entering from the east, note the gaudy lions and the 1886 signature of Krishnabir, the master stonemason who sculpted the fine doorway with its frieze of Buddhist deities. This second doorway leads to the main courtyard of the Golden Temple; shoes and leather articles must be removed to enter the lower courtyard. The main priest of the temple is a young boy under the age of 12, who serves for 30 days before handing the job over to another young boy.

The temple itself is a magnificent example of courtyard temple architecture. Two elephant statues guard the doorway and the facade is covered by a host of gleaming Buddhist figures. Inside the main shrine is a beautiful statue of Sakyamuni (no photos allowed). To the left of the courtyard is a statue of Green Tara and in the right corner is a statue of the Bodhisattva Vajrasattva wearing an impressive silver-and-gold cape. Both are inside inner shrines.

Facing the main temple is a smaller shrine containing a ‘self-arisen’ (swayambhu) chaitya. The four corners of the courtyard have statues of four Lokeshvaras (incarnations of Avalokiteshvara) and four monkeys, which hold out jackfruits as an offering. A stairway leads to an upper-floor chapel dedicated to a white eight-armed Avalokiteshvara, lined with Tibetan-style frescoes including a wheel of life. Finally, as you leave the temple at the eastern exit, look up to see an embossed mandala mounted on the ceiling. Outside of winter, look for the tortoises pottering around the compound – these are the temple guardians.

It’s worth ducking south towards Durbar Sq to see the small, two-tiered Uma Maheshwar Temple and the handsome stone Gauri Shankar Temple, in the Indian shikhara style. Across the road, the Buddhist Maru Mandapa Mahavihar is set in a small courtyard.

  • Mul Chowk:

South of the Patan Museum, a gateway opens onto the stately Mul Chowk, the largest and oldest of the Royal Palace’s three main chowks (squares). The original buildings were destroyed by fire in 1662 but rebuilt just three years later by Srinivasa Malla. The temples in the courtyard were restored in 2014 and the surrounding walls and buildings were quickly restored after the 2015 earthquake.

In the center of the square is the small, gilded, central Bidyapith Temple, beside a wooden post used to secure animals for sacrifices. The central deity is Yantaju, a form of Durga, and a personal deity to the Malla kings.

On the south side of the square is the Taleju Bhawani Temple, flanked by statues of the river goddesses Ganga, on a tortoise, and Jamuna, on a Makara. The upper galleries now form part of the museum's architectural displays, with fine examples of carved wooden struts.

At the northeastern corner of the square is the tall Degutalle Temple, topped by an octagonal triple-roofed tower. The larger, triple-roofed Taleju Temple is directly north, looking out over Durbar Sq, and dedicated to Taleju, another protective deity of the Malla kings.

  • Patan Museum:

Formerly the residence of the Malla kings, the section of the Royal Palace surrounding Keshav Narayan Chowk now houses one of the finest collections of religious art in Asia. The museum is a national treasure and an invaluable introduction to the art, symbolism, and architecture of the valley. You need at least an hour, and preferably two, to do this place justice, and it’s worth taking a break at the Museum Café before diving in for another round.

The collection is displayed in a series of brick and timber rooms, linked by steep and narrow stairways. There are informative labels on each of the hundreds of statues, carvings, and votive objects, allowing you to put a name to many of the deities depicted at temples around the valley.

There are also some interesting displays on the techniques used to create these wonderful objects, including the art of repoussé and the ‘lost wax method of casting. The top floor houses some fascinating photos of Patan at the end of the 19th century. The museum has a shop selling reproductions of some of the works displayed inside.

  • Royal Palace:

Forming the entire eastern side of Durbar Sq, the Royal Palace of Patan was originally built in the 14th century and expanded during the 17th and 18th centuries by Siddhinarsingh Malla, Srinivasa Malla, and Vishnu Malla. The Patan palace predates the palaces in Kathmandu and Bhaktapur and remains one of the architectural highlights of Nepal.

 Behind the extravagant facade, with its overhanging eaves, carved windows and delicate wooden screens, are a series of connecting courtyards and a trip of temples dedicated to the valley’s main deity, the goddess Taleju. The closed external Bhairab gateway leading to the central Mul Chowk courtyard is flanked by two stone lions and colorful murals of Shiva in his wrathful incarnation as Bhairab. Strings of buffalo guts are hung above the door in his honor.

The northern courtyard is reached through the Golden Gate (Sun Dhoka). Installed in 1734, this finely engraved and gilded gateway is topped by a golden Torana showing Shiva, Parvati, Ganesh, and Kumar (an incarnation of Skanda, the god of war). Directly above the gateway is a window made from gold foil wrapped around a timber frame, where the king once made public appearances. This gateway now forms the entrance to the Patan Museum and northern ticket office.

Restoration works following the 2015 earthquake are not the first to take place at the palace. Reconstruction followed the conquest of the valley by Prithvi Narayan Shah in 1768, and again after the great earthquake of 1934.

  • Krishna Mandir:

Heading into Durbar Sq, you can’t miss the splendid Krishna Mandir built by King Siddhinarsingh Malla in 1637. Constructed from carved stone – in place of the usual brick and timber – this fabulous architectural confection shows the clear influence of Indian temple design and is the earliest stone temple of its type in Nepal. The temple stayed intact through the 2015 earthquake.

The temple consists of three tiers, fronted by columns and supporting a northern Indian–style shikhara spire. The distinctive temple is often depicted on the ornate brass butter lamps hung in Nepali homes. Non-Hindus cannot enter to view the statue of Krishna, the goatherd, but you’ll often hear temple musicians playing upstairs. Vishnu’s mount, the man-bird Garuda, kneels with folded arms on top of a column facing the temple. The delicate stone carvings along the beam on the 1st-floor recount events from the Mahabharata, while the hard-to-see beam on the 2nd floor features scenes from the Ramayana.

A major festival, Krishna Jayanta, also known as Krishnasthami, is held here in the Nepali month of Bhadra (August to September) for Krishna’s birthday.

  • Sundari Chowk:

South of Mul Chowk is the smaller Sundari Chowk, arranged around a superbly carved sunken water tank known as the Tusha Hiti. The chowk was restored in 2014, and again after the 2015 earthquake. Built-in 1647, the renovated water tank has 72 carved stone plaques depicting Tantric deities and was used by the king for ritual ablutions. The spout is new; the original was stolen in 2010 (and recovered). Ancient carved wooden struts lie scattered in the corners.

On the way outlook at the restored Bhandarkhal water tank, once the main water supply for the palace, features a charming meditation pavilion.

Back in Durbar Sq, the traditional gateway to Sundari Chowk features three magnificent statues of Hanuman (barely recognizable beneath layers of orange paint), Ganesh, and Vishnu as Narasimha, the man-lion, tearing out the entrails of a demon.

  • Golden Gate

The entry to Patan Museum is through the Royal Palace's superb Golden Gate. Installed in 1734, this finely engraved and gilded gateway is topped by a golden Torana showing Shiva, Parvati, Ganesh, and Kumar (an incarnation of Skanda, the god of war).

Directly above the gateway is a window made from gold foil wrapped around a timber frame, where the king once made public appearances.

  • Rato Machhendranath Temple:

Almost directly across the road from the Minnath Temple, down an alley, a white-columned gateway leads to the wide, open square containing the revered Rato Machhendranath Temple. Dedicated to the god of rain and plenty, the temple, like so many in Nepal, blurs the line between Buddhism and Hinduism. Buddhists regard Rato (Red) Machhendranath as an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara, while Hindus see him as an incarnation of Shiva.

Set inside a protective metal fence, the towering three-story temple dates from 1673, but there has been some kind of temple on this site since at least 1408. The temple’s four ornate doorways are guarded by stone snow lions, and at ground level on the four corners of the temple plinth are yeti-like demons known as kyah.

Mounted on freestanding pillars at the front of the temple is a curious collection of metal animals in protective cages, including a peacock, Garuda, horse, buffalo, lion, elephant, fish, and snake. Look up to see the richly painted roof struts of the temple, which show Avalokiteshvara standing above figures being tortured in hell.

The main image of Machhendranath resides here for six months a year, before moving to Bungamati during the spectacular Rato Machhendranath Festival in April/May.

  • Mahabouddha Temple:

As you step through the entryway of this hard-to-find courtyard in the southeast of Patan, the temple suddenly looms above you, crammed in like a plant straining to get some sunlight. Built-in the Indian shikhara style, the shrine takes its name from the hundreds of terracotta tiles that cover it, each bearing an image of the Buddha. The shikhara is upright, although it was cloaked in heavy-duty scaffolding when we last visited.

The temple dates from 1585 but was rebuilt after the 1934 earthquake. Unfortunately, without plans to work from, the builders ended up with a different-looking temple and had enough bricks and tiles left over to construct a smaller shrine to Maya Devi, the Buddha’s mother, in the corner of the courtyard. The temple is loosely modeled on the Mahabouddha Temple at Bodhgaya in India, where the Buddha gained enlightenment.

The surrounding lanes are full of shops selling high-quality Patan-style metal statues. The roof terrace of the shop at the back of the courtyard has a good view of the temple.

To reach the Mahabouddha Temple, you must walk southeast from Durbar Sq along Hakha Tole, passing a series of small Vaishnavite and Shaivite temples. When you reach Sundhara Tole, with its temple and sunken hiti (water tank) with three brass water spouts, turn right and look for the tiny doorway leading to the temple.

  • Kumbeshwar Temple:

 Due north of Durbar Sq is the eye-catching Kumbeshwar Temple, one of the valley’s three five-story temples. This tall, thin mandir (temple) features some particularly artistic woodcarving, and it seems to defy gravity as it towers above the surrounding houses. Amazingly, this precarious structure survived the earthquake, though the top tier toppled in May 2015 and the tower is now leaning slightly. A large Nandi statue and central lingam indicate that the shrine is sacred to Shiva.

The temple platform has two ponds whose water is said to come straight from the holy lake at Gosainkund, a weeklong trek north of the valley. Bathing in the tank at Kumbeshwar Temple is said to be as meritorious as making the arduous walk to Gosainkund.

The surrounding square is dotted with temples sacred to Bhairab and Baglamukhi (Parvati). Local women gather at the tank known as Konti Hiti to socialize, wash clothes and fill up their water jugs. Down an alley to the north of the temple is the Kumbeshwar Technical School.

From here you can detour north to see the Northern Stupa, one of four marker shrines showing the old city limits of Patan.

  • King Yoganarendra Malla’s Statue

 South of the Jagannarayan Temple is a tall column topped by a striking brass statue of King Yoganarendra Malla (r 1684–1705) and his queens. Installed in 1700, the column toppled in the 2015 earthquake but was one of the first items to be restored. Looming over the king's head is a cobra, and alighted on the head of the cobra is a small brass bird.

Legend has it that as long as the bird remains, the king may still return to his palace. Accordingly, a door and window of the palace are always kept open and a hookah pipe is kept ready. A rider to the legend adds that when the bird flies off, the elephants in front of the Vishwanath Temple will stroll over the Manga Hiti for a drink.

Behind the statue of the king are three smaller Vishnu temples, including a brick-and-plaster shikhara temple, built-in 1590 to enshrine an image of Narsingha, Vishnu’s man-lion incarnation.

  • Peace Gallery

Nepal's decade-long civil war has been marked by a photo exhibition that brings the conflict poignantly to life. Based on the book A People War by Nepali Times editor Kunda Dixit, the exhibition is on display at the Peace Gallery inside the Rato Bangla School. It's possible the exhibition will find a new home, in which case contact the Bhaktapur Tourism Development Committee for updates.

The images include portraits of schoolchildren giving the Maoist red salute, siblings who faced each other on either side of the front line, and a teacher who continued to teach despite having his hands cut off by Maoists. It's everything photojournalism should be – nuanced, moving, surprising, and never simplistic.

Enter the school, just behind Dhokaima Café, and ask for directions. The gallery is on the 4th floor of an administration building.

  • Bhimsen Temple

At the northern end of Durbar Sq, the Bhimsen Temple is dedicated to the god of trade and business, which may explain its prosperous appearance. One of the five Pandavas from the Mahabharata, Bhimsen is credited with superhuman strength – he is often depicted as a red muscleman, lifting a horse or crushing an elephant under his knee.

The three-storey pagoda has an unusual rectangular plan that sets it apart from other temples in Patan. The current temple was completely rebuilt in 1682 after a fire and was later restored after the 1934 earthquake, and again in 1967. Once repairs following the 2015 quake are complete, non-Hindus may once again be able to climb to the upper level (the inner sanctum is usually upstairs in Bhimsen temples) to view the wild-eyed statue of Bhimsen.

  • Uku Bahal  or the Rudra Varna Mahavihar:

 Located south of Patan Durbar Square, the Rudra Varna Mahavihar (Uku Bahal) Newar Buddhist Monastery is known locally as Rudra Varna Mahavihar. One of several popular attractions of culture worth stopping by to see in Patan city. The area around Rudra Varna Mahavihar contains 3 courtyards and each has interesting and unique features. The highlight is, of course, the main Uku Bahal central courtyard which was started by King Shivadev (590-604) as one of five monasteries.

The outer courtyard is marked by an impressive gate with two flag-bearing lion statues on top that wouldn’t look out of place in London. These were a later addition in 1680. The courtyard at the back of Rudra Varna Mahavihar is relatively modern and belongs to the residents surrounding it. Nonetheless, it’s worth taking a walk around it and possibly admitting some of the painted sculptures and stupa there.

  • Minnath Temple

Just 200m south of I Baha Bahi, a large water tank marks the entrance to a courtyard strewn with wooden beams. In the center is the brightly painted, two-tiered Minnath Temple, dedicated to the Bodhisattva Jatadhari Lokesvara, who is considered to be the little brother of Rato Machhendranath. The temple was founded in the Licchavi period (3rd to 9th centuries), but the multi-armed goddesses on the roof struts were added much later.

Note the metal pots and pans nailed to the temple rafters by devotees. The timbers surrounding the temple are assembled into a chariot every year to haul the statue of Minnath around town as part of the Rato Machhendranath Festival.

  • Vishwanath Temple

 South of the Bhimsen Temple stands the Vishwanath Temple, dedicated to Shiva. This elaborately decorated two-tiered pagoda was built in 1627 and it features some particularly ornate woodcarving, especially on the Torana (lintel) above the colonnade.

On the west side is a statue of Shiva’s loyal mount, Nandi the bull, while the east side features two stone elephants with mahouts, one elephant crushing a man beneath its foot. When the doors are open, you can view the enormous lingam inside.

  • Manga Hiti

Immediately across from Bhimsen Temple is the sunken Manga Hiti, one of the water conduits with which Patan is liberally endowed. The tank contains a cruciform-shaped pool and three wonderfully carved Dhara (water spouts) in the shape of Makara (mythical crocodile-like beasts). The two wooden ceremonial pavilions that overlook the tank – known as the Mani Mandap – collapsed in the 2015 earthquake and are under repair.

  • Hari Shankar Temple

 This temple is dedicated to Hari Shankar, a curious hybrid deity that has half the attributes of Vishnu and half the attributes of Shiva. Although it collapsed in the 2015 earthquake, restoration of this three-storey temple is underway using recovered materials, including the roof struts carved with scenes of the tortures of the damned. The original temple was built in 1704–05 by the daughter of King Yoganarendra Malla.

  • Tusha Hiti

The highlight of Sundari Chowk is the superbly carved sunken water tank known as the Tusha Hiti. Built-in 1647, the renovated tank has 72 carved stone plaques depicting Tantric deities and was used by the king for ritual ablutions. The spout is new; the original was stolen in 2010 but recently recovered. Ancient carved wooden struts lie neglected in the corners like kindling wood.

Bhaktapur:

The third of the medieval city-states in the Kathmandu Valley, Bhaktapur was always described as the best-preserved. Tragically, however, the 2015 earthquake caused terrible devastation and loss of life. Nevertheless, only a few temples were destroyed, there is still much to see here and tourism is vital to the community.

Many Nepalis use the old name of Bhadgaon (pronounced bud-gown) or the Newari name Khwopa, which means City of Devotees. The name fits – Bhaktapur has three major squares full of towering temples that comprise some of the finest religious architecture in the country.

Cultural life is also proudly on display. Along narrow alleys, artisans weave cloth and chisel timber, squares are filled with drying pots, and locals gather in courtyards to bathe, collect water, play cards and socialize. To view this tapestry of Nepali life, visitors must pay a town entry fee, which helps fund temple repair and maintenance.

One of the most fascinating and important World Heritage Sites in Nepal, Bhaktapur is made up of three large squares filled with historic shrines and temples, Newar architecture, and fine art. Famous for its clay pots and exquisite wood carvings, Bhaktapur is also legendary for its colorful festivals and its delicious and unique cuisine. Bhaktapur retains its medieval feel and the local people are still engaged in farming and traditional crafts like pottery, metalwork, art, and woodwork which have supported the city since it was established in the 12th century. You see the magnificent Golden Gate in Durbar Square (square of the palaces), the Palace of 55 Windows, the Nyota Pola Temple, Newar houses, and pottery square. 

Must-see attractions in Bhaktapur

  • The Golden Gate:

The magnificent Golden Gate is a visual highlight of Durbar Sq. Set into a bright red gatehouse surrounded by white palace walls, the fabulous golden portal boasts some of Nepal's finest repoussé metalwork. The gilded Torana features a fabulous Garuda wrestling with a number of supernatural serpents, while below is a four-headed and 10-armed figure of the goddess Taleju Bhawani, the family deity of the Malla kings.

 Construction of the gate began during the reign of King Bhupatindra Malla (r 1696–1722), and the project was completed by his successor, Jaya Ranjit Malla, in 1754. The death of Jaya Ranjit Malla marked the end of the Malla dynasty and the end of the golden age of Newari architecture in Nepal.

The gate opens to the inner courtyards of the Royal Palace, a once vast compound until the 1934 earthquake leveled all but a handful of its 99 courtyards. More walls toppled during the 2015 earthquake. To the right of the Golden Gate is the 55 Window Palace, which, you guessed it, has 55 intricate wooden windows stretching along with its upper level.

As you enter the palace complex, hidden behind grills in the darkness on either side of the inner gate is a pair of enormous war drums, which were used to rouse the city in the event of an attack. From here you’ll pass the two statues of traditionally dressed guards standing on either side of an ornate door, brought here from Rajasthan.

Continuing on you’ll reach the main entrance to Mul Chowk, the oldest part of the palace and the site of Taleju Temple, built-in 1553. Damaged in the quake but not destroyed, it is one of the most sacred temples in Bhaktapur. Only Hindus can enter, but you can peer in and admire its entrance, which is fronted by magnificent woodcarvings. Photography is prohibited.

Continuing on around the corner from Mul Chowk is the Naga Pokhari, a 17th-century water tank used for the ritual immersion of the idol of Taleju. The pool is encircled by a writhing stone cobra and other serpents rise up in the middle and at the end of the tank, where water pours from a magnificent Dhara (spout) in the form of a goat being eaten by a Makara.

  • Nyatapola Temple

You should be able to see the sky-high rooftop of the Nyatapola Temple long before you reach Taumadhi Tole. With five storeys towering 30m above the square, this is the tallest temple in all of Nepal and one of the tallest buildings in the Kathmandu Valley. This perfectly proportioned temple was built in 1702 during the reign of King Bhupatindra Malla, and the construction was so sturdy that the 1934 and 2015 earthquakes caused only minor damage.

The temple is reached by a stairway flanked by stone figures of the temple guardians. At the bottom are the legendary Rajput wrestlers Jayamel and Phattu, depicted kneeling with hefty maces. Subsequent levels are guarded by elephants with floral saddles, lions adorned with bells, beaked griffons with rams’ horns, and finally two goddesses – Baghini and Singhini. Each figure is said to be 10 times as strong as the figure on the level below.

The temple is dedicated to Siddhi Lakshmi, a bloodthirsty incarnation of the goddess Durga (Parvati). The idol of the goddess is so fearsome that only the temple’s priests are allowed to enter the inner sanctum, but less brutal incarnations of the goddess appear on the Torana above the door, beneath a canopy of braided snakes, and also on the temple’s 180 carved roof struts. In a classic piece of religious crossover, the Buddhist eight lucky signs are carved beside the temple doorways.

Look for the chariot runners piled up on the north side of the temple.

  • Potters’ Square

Hidden down shop-lined alleyways leading south from the curving road to Taumadhi Tole, Potters’ Sq is exactly what you would expect – a public square full of potter's wheels and rows of clay pots drying in the sun. Nearby buildings were damaged by the 2015 earthquake, but life – and pottery – in the square continues.

This is the center of Bhaktapur’s ceramic industry, and it’s a fascinating place to wander around. Several shops sell the finished article, and you can see the firing process at the back of the square, which is lined with mud-covered straw kilns.

On the northern side of the square, a small hillock is topped by a shady pipal tree and a Ganesh shrine, surrounded by piles of straw for the pottery kilns. In the square itself is a solid-brick Vishnu Temple, which was constructed from remnants of temples destroyed in the 1934 quake, and the double-roofed Jeth Ganesh Temple, whose priest is chosen from the Kumal (potters’) caste. During the harvest in October, every square inch that is not covered by pots is covered by drying rice.

  • Bhairabnath Temple

The broad-fronted, triple-roofed Bhairabnath Temple is dedicated to Bhairab, the fearsome incarnation of Shiva, whose consort occupies the Nyatapola Temple across the square. Despite Bhairab’s fearsome powers and his massive temple, the deity is depicted here as a disembodied head just 15cm high! Casually stacked against the north wall of the temple are the enormous wheels and runners from the chariot used to haul the image of Bhairab around town during the Bisket Jatra festival in mid-April.

The first temple on this site was a modest structure built in the early 17th century, but King Bhupatindra Malla added an extra storey in 1717, and a third level was added when the temple was rebuilt after the 1934 earthquake. The final version of the temple has a similar rectangular plan to the Bhimsen Temple in Patan’s Durbar Sq.

A small hole in the temple's central door (below a row of carved boar snouts) is used to push offerings into the temple’s interior; prior to the 2015 earthquake, priests accessed the interior through the small Betal Temple, on the south side of the main pagoda, but this collapsed entirely, and restoration work is underway.

The temple’s facade is guarded by two brass lions holding the Nepali flag, the only national flag that is not rectangular or square. To the right of the door is an image of Bhairab painted on the rattan, decorated with a gruesome garland of buffalo guts. Head here at dusk to hear traditional devotional music.

Next to the temple is a sunken hiti with a particularly fine spout in the form of a Makara (mythical crocodile-like beast).

  • National Art Gallery

The western end of Bhaktapur's Royal Palace contains the best of the three museums in Bhaktapur. Inside, you can view an extensive collection of Tantric cloth paintings – the Hindu version of Buddhist thangkas – as well as palm-leaf manuscripts, and metal, stone, and wooden votive objects, some of which date from the 12th century. Keep hold of your ticket as this also covers the Woodcarving Museum and Brass & Bronze Museum in Tachupal Tole.

The entrance to the gallery is flanked by two huge guardian lions, one male, and one female. Besides the lions are some imposing 17th-century statues of Hanuman the monkey god, in his four-armed Tantric form, and Vishnu, as the gut-ripping Narsingha.

Inside the gallery are portraits of all the Shah kings, including a surly Gyanendra (the last of the Nepali kings) following the abolition of the monarchy in 2008. In the first gallery lookout for depictions of the nightmarish Maha Sambhar, with 21 faces and an unbelievable number of arms, and then turn around on the spot for scenes from the Kama Sutra.

  • Char Dham Temples

Standing at the western end of Durbar Sq, the four Char Dham temples were constructed to provide spiritual merit for pilgrims who were unable to make the journey to the Indian state of Uttaranchal to visit its famed Char Dham temples. After the 2015 earthquake, only three remained. The shikhara-style Kedarnath Temple, dedicated to Shiva, was shaken apart by the tremor but was actively under reconstruction when we last visited.

Although damaged, the three remaining temples are still worth visiting. The two-roofed Gopi Nath Temple (also called Jagarnath) features different incarnations of Vishnu on the ceiling struts and a statue of Garuda on the pillar at the entrance.

The small Rameshwar Temple, topped by an ornate dome, is still standing on its four repaired but cracked pillars. The Badrinath Temple is sacred to Vishnu in his incarnation as Narayan.

  • Dattatreya Temple

At the east end of Tachupal Tole, the eye-catching Dattatreya Temple was originally built in 1427, supposedly using timber from a single tree. The slightly mismatched front porch was added later. The temple is dedicated to Dattatreya, a curious hybrid deity, blending elements of Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva. Judging from the Garuda statue and the conch and chakra disc mounted on pillars supported by stone turtles in front of the temple, Vishnu seems to have come out on top.

The three-storey temple is raised above the ground on a brick and terracotta base, which is carved with erotic scenes, including unexpected humor where one bored-looking woman multitasks by washing her hair while being pleasured by her husband. The main steps to the temple are guarded by statues of the same two Malla wrestlers who watch over the first plinth of the Nyatapola Temple.

  • Taleju Bell

In front of what once was the Vatsala Durga Temple is a large bell, which was erected by King Jaya Ranjit Malla in 1737 to mark morning and evening prayers at the Taleju Temple.

A smaller bell on the plinth of the Vatsala Durga Temple was known as the ‘barking bell’. According to legend, it was erected by King Bhupatindra Malla in 1721 to counteract a vision he had in a dream, and dogs were said to bark and whine when the bell was rung. Unfortunately, it was damaged when the temple collapsed in 2015 and it now sits forlornly in a corner of the entrance to Mul Chowk.

Behind the bell, the pavilion is an ornate sunken hiti containing a fine stone Dhara in the form of a Makara, topped by a crocodile and a frog – the only part of the famous Vatsala Durga Temple to survive the 2015 earthquake.

  • Ugrachandi & Bhairab Statues

As you enter Durbar Sq through the western gate, look left to a gateway flanked by two stocky stone lions, erected by King Bhupatindra Malla in 1701. On either side are statues of the terrible Bhairab (right), the rending, sundering incarnation of Shiva, and his consort on the left side, the equally terrible Ugrachandi (Durga). It is said that the unfortunate sculptor had his hands cut off afterward, to prevent him from duplicating his masterpieces.

Ugrachandi has 18 arms holding various Tantric weapons symbolizing the multiple aspects of her character. She is depicted casually killing a demon with a trident to symbolize the victory of wisdom over ignorance. Bhairab gets by with just 12 arms, one holding two heads impaled on a trident and another holding a cup made from a human skull. The statues originally guarded a courtyard that was destroyed in the 1934 quake.

  • Til Mahadev Narayan Temple

This interesting temple at Taumadhi Tole has hidden away behind the buildings at the south end of the square. The Til Mahadev Narayan Temple is set in an untidy courtyard, but this is actually an important place of pilgrimage and one of the oldest temples in the city. An inscription states that the site has been in use since 1080 and that the image of Til Mahadev was installed here in 1170.

 The double-tiered temple is fronted by an elegant kneeling Garuda statue on a pillar and two columns bearing the sacred sankha and chakra symbols of Vishnu. In case Shiva was feeling left out, a lingam symbol on a yoni base (the Shaivite symbol for the male and female genitals) stands behind a wooden grill in front and to one side of the temple. A plaque to the right of the door depicts the Buddhist deity Vajrayogini in a characteristic pose with her left leg high in the air.

  • Khalna Tole

Southeast of Potters' Sq and above the river is the wide-open square of Khalna Tole, the setting for the spectacular Bisket Jatra festival. Many flanking houses were damaged in the 2015 earthquake, but restoration work is underway. In the middle of the square, note the huge stone yoni where the giant lingam is erected during the festival. You may have to pick your way through mountains of drying rice and grain to get here.

Just south of the bridge, past an orange Hanuman statue on the riverbank is the campus of the Kathmandu University Department of Music, where the sound of traditional music wafts over the peaceful ornamental gardens. Across the river are the modern cremation plinths at Chuping Ghat.

  • Pujari Math

Tachupal Tole is flanked by a series of ornate brick-and-timber buildings that were originally used as math (Hindu priests’ houses). The best known is the Pujari Math, which now serves as the Woodcarving Museum. The building was damaged in the 2015 earthquake, but its most famous feature – the superb 15th-century Peacock Window, widely regarded as the finest carved window in the Kathmandu Valley – is intact.

 The building was first constructed in the 15th century during the reign of King Yaksha Malla but rebuilt in 1763. German experts renovated the building in 1979 as a wedding gift for the then King Birendra. Many surrounding shops sell miniature wooden copies of the Peacock Window as souvenirs.

  • Suriya Binayak Temple:

South of Bhaktapur, on the south side of the Arniko Hwy, Suriya Binayak is an important Ganesh temple dating back to the 17th century. The white shikhara-style temple contains some interesting statuary, but the main attractions are the peaceful setting and the walk uphill above the temple to a hillside with sweeping views over Bhaktapur. The temple is flanked by statues of Malla kings and a large statue of Ganesh’s vehicle, the rat.

To get here, take the road south from Potters’ Sq to Ram Ghat (where there are areas for ritual bathing and cremations) and cross the river to the Arniko Hwy. On the other side, it’s a 1km walk along the road to the start of the steps to the temple. Bank on around 30 minutes from Taumadhi Tole.

  • Tadhunchen Bahal

Walking east from Durbar Sq, you’ll pass the gateway to the restored Tadhunchen Bahal monastery, tucked between souvenir shops. This Buddhist temple is linked to the cult of the Kumari, Bhaktapur’s living goddess. Bhaktapur actually has three Kumaris, but they lack the political importance of Kathmandu.

In the inner courtyard, the roof struts on the eastern side have unusual carvings that show the tortures of the damned. In one, a snake is wrapped around a man, another shows two rams butting an unfortunate’s head, while a third strut shows a nasty tooth extraction being performed with a large pair of pliers!

  • Hanuman Ghat

 This impressive collection of chaitya, Shiva statues, Shaivite shrines, and lingam in the town's southeast includes what could well be the two largest Shiva lingam (in equally large yoni) in Nepal. The site was damaged in the 2015 quake, but most structures are still standing. Through the archway are more statues beside the stinking confluence of rivers at Hanuman Ghat. Note the exquisitely carved images of Ganesh, Sakyamuni, Ram and Sita, Hanuman and Vishnu/Narayan, reclining on a bed of snakes. Hindu yogis often come here to meditate.

  • King Bhupatindra Malla’s Column

With hands folded in a prayer position, the bronze statue of King Bhupatindra Malla sits atop a column in front of the Vatsala Durga Temple. The statue was created in 1699 and similar statues were erected in the Durbar Sqs of Kathmandu and Patan. Both of the latter collapsed in 2015; Patan's was restored, but Kathmandu's was awaiting restoration at the time of research. Bhupatindra was the best known of the Malla kings of Bhaktapur and contributed to much of the architecture in town.

  • Chyasilin Mandap

'Chyasilin' refers to the eight-cornered roof of this pavilion. It was rebuilt in 1990 using old photos and paintings and components from the original building, which was destroyed in the 1934 earthquake. With modern steel-frame technology underpinning it, it survived the 2015 earthquake. The original was used to receive royal guests, the upper floor used as a viewing platform during festivals, and at least once it was the venue of a poetry competition.

  • Brass & Bronze Museum:

Directly across from the Woodcarving Museum, in another old math (Hindu priest’s house) with similar lighting problems, this museum has some excellent examples of traditional metalwork, including ceremonial lamps and ritual vessels from around the valley. Hold on to your ticket to avoid paying for entry to the Woodcarving Museum and National Art Gallery.

  • Woodcarving Museum

This museum has some fine examples of Bhaktapur woodcarving displayed in dark, creaky rooms. There isn’t enough light to justify paying the camera fee, but it’s worth a visit, not least for the extravagantly carved windows in the inner courtyard. The same ticket covers entry to the nearby Brass & Bronze Museum and the National Art Gallery.

  • Pashupatinath Temple

Behind the Vatsala Durga Temple, the Pashupatinath Temple is dedicated to Shiva as Pashupati and is a replica of the main shrine at Pashupatinath. Originally built by King Yaksha Malla in 1475 (or 1482), it is the oldest temple in Durbar Sq. Like many temples, the roof struts feature erotic images, but what exactly the dwarf is doing with that bowl takes things to a new level.

After Bhaktapur sightseeing we will then move on to Changunarayana:

Changunarayana:

This temple is said to be the oldest Hindu temple still in use in the Kathmandu Valley. Built in the two-tiered pagoda style, the main shrine here is guarded on all sides by pairs of real and mythical beasts – elephants, lions, winged lions, and ram-horned griffons – and its roof struts feature some amazingly intricate carvings of Tantric deities. Changu Narayan and its associated buildings were badly affected by the 2015 earthquake however; restoration of the complex is underway.

The statue inside shows Vishnu as Narayan, the creator of all life, but the beautifully decorated metal-plate doors are only opened for rituals and only Hindus may enter.

The Garuda figure facing the west door is said to date from the 5th century, and in front of this statue is the oldest stone inscription in the valley, dating from AD 464, which recalls how the king persuaded his mother not to commit Sati (ritual suicide) after his father’s death. Two large pillars carry a conch and chakra disc, the traditional symbols of Vishnu.

Dotted around the courtyard are a series of extraordinary carvings dating from the Licchavi era, showing Vishnu in his various avatars (incarnations). Vishnu appears in the southwest corner of the compound as Narsingha (his man-lion incarnation), disemboweling a demon with his fingers, and as Vikrantha (Vamana), the six-armed dwarf who transformed himself into a giant capable of crossing the universe in three steps to defeat King Bali (look for his outstretched leg).

To the side of these images is a broken slab showing a 10-headed and 10-armed Vishnu, with Ananta reclining on a serpent below. The plaque is divided into three sections – the underworld, the world of man, and the heavens. In the northwest corner of the compound is an exquisite 7th-century image of Vishnu astride Garuda, which is illustrated on the Rs 10 banknote.

The squat temple in the southeast corner of the complex is dedicated to the Tantric goddess Chhinnamasta, who beheaded herself to feed the bloodthirsty deities Dakini and Varnini.

After completing the Changunarayan tour we will then return back to Kathmandu.

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After a leisurely breakfast in the Kathmandu hotel, we will then drive to Pokhara and check in at the hotel.

Upon arrival in Pokhara, check-in at the hotel and have a rest. Later in the afternoon, you can go to stroll around the lakeside street of Pokhara and to the bank of Phewa Lake.

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Today, you will start with an early drive to Sarangkot to capture the tranquil and magical view of the city before sunrise. You will view the first rays of sunlight hitting the mountains in the background. Sarangkot offers panoramic views of the Annapurna, Fishtail, Dhaulagiri, and other mountains.

After Sarankot, we will return to the hotel for some rest and will set off for full-day sightseeing in this beautiful lakeside town. You will be visiting the World Peace Stupa which is almost an hour far away from Pokhara and lies on the top of the hill. After reaching over there, you will get to see the spectacular panoramic views of the mountains to your north and west. Annapurna, Nilgiri, Glacier dome, Fishtail Mountain, and the Dhaulagiri mountain ranges can be seen from this place. After enjoying this view, you will hike down around 40-60 minutes to the bank of Phewa Lake.

Enjoy the boating to have a sight excursion to the BarahiTemple, which is situated at the center of Phewa Lake. Then you will visit Devi's fall, Gupteswor cave, Seti George, Mahendra cave, Mountain museum, and the Tibetan Refugee camp. After completing your sightseeing get back to the hotel and have a rest.

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On this day you will have a scenic drive back to Kathmandu, starting from Pokhara after breakfast. Upon arrival at Kathmandu, you will be then transferred to your respective hotel and have a rest. In the evening, you can stroll around the downtown area in Thamel.

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Approximately 3 hours before the departure of your flight, you will be transferred to Kathmandu international airport where we guide you to the check-in hall. From here we hope you had an amazing journey through our country, Nepal. And we hope to see you again.

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Includes and Excludes

    • All ground transfers by private AC vehicle including airport pickup and drop
    • 3 nights of hotel accommodations at hotel Yatri Suites and Spa or similar in Kathmandu on a twin sharing basis including breakfast and  all taxes
    • Kathmandu, Patan, Bhaktapur and Changunarayan, Pokhara, Sarangkot sightseeing with an English-speaking guide as per the above itinerary including all applicable entrance fees, private AC transfer vehicle, guide and driver's wages, etc.
    • Hotel Kuti Resort in Pokhara on a twin sharing basis including breakfast and all taxes.
    • Complimentary welcome or farewell dinner in Kathmandu at a cultural restaurant [optional]
    • ​​​​​​​
    • Food, Drinks, and Beverage bills for you.
    • International airfare, Nepal visa fees (two passport photographs), travel and medical insurance, and emergency evacuation if required.
    • Personal nature expenses (bars and beverage bills, drinking water, bottled drinks, hot shower, telephone, laundry, titbits, etc.)
    • Costs arising from natural calamities, mishaps, or anything beyond our control (Costs are not refundable and transferable by any means if you leave the tour voluntarily and want to return from the tour early.
    • Any other services not mentioned in the inclusion section.

FAQs

Pokhara is an attractive and exciting destination for all travelers, regardless of their age or the type of pleasure they seek. There is nothing you can miss in this place, from hills to waterfalls to pure lakes, markets and shrines.

However, there are other activities that tourists to Pokhara should do, and these can be divided down into day excursions. Visitors should spend at least two or three days in Pokhara, depending on their schedule.

Pokhara is one of Nepal's most visited tourist spots. Pokhara Valley attracts many tourists who come to witness the Himalayan range and lakes. Boating, trekking, rafting, and extreme activities including rafting, canoeing, and bungee jumping are all popular in Pokhara.

The greatest time to visit Pokhara is from September through November, which is also the main tourist season. Pokhara's coldest months are December to February. Because Pokhara is so close to the Himalayas, the winter lasts until March, and the peak months are when tourists go trekking and hiking.

Yes, although only on rare occasions; for example, in some parts of Pokhara, snow has recently fallen in 2021. For a massive snowstorm To enjoy snowfall in Pokhara, you must travel to somewhat higher altitudes than these towns.

Extras

To enhance your experience in Nepal, we give you the possibility to add one or more extra activities to this travel package. The step of adding these is available in the "Book now" process.

Nepal - Kathmandu to Pokhara Package | 6 nights 7 days | Tour Cost, Map, Itinerary (7 Days)

Nepal is a land of unparalleled scenic beauty and one of the most diverse geographical regions on earth. It contains an incredible variety of terrain in a relatively small area, ranging from the tropical lowlands of the “Terai” at about 300 ft above sea level to the summit of Mt. Everest at 29,035 ft (8850m)! What adds an even more interesting dimension to Nepal is the fact that its friendly people are from over 130 different ethnic groups! 

There are few countries in the world that are as well set up for independent travel as Nepal. Wandering the trekking shops, bakeries, and pizzerias of Kathmandu's tourist hub, Thamel and Pokhara, its s easy to feel that you have somehow landed in a kind of backpacker Disneyland. Out in the countryside lies a quite different Nepal, where traditional mountain life continues at a slower pace, and a million potential adventures glimmer on the mountain horizons. The biggest problem you might face in Nepal is just how to fit everything in, which is one reason why many people return here over and over again.

Kathmandu – Pokhara 5 nights 6 days tour program is specially designed to provide you with the very best taste of Nepal within a relatively short period of time and at the same time provide you with the opportunity to cover most of the sights and sounds of this intriguing country. Initially starting the trip with exploring Kathmandu valley's major attractions, the tour then moves on to the beautiful lakeside town of Pokhara

Book Now: Nepal Highlights Tour 13 Days | Pokhara | Lumbini | Bandipur | Chitwan (Cost, Route, and Map)

 Stretched along the shores of Phewa Lake and dotted with colorful bobbing paddle boats, Pokhara in fact is a little slice of tranquility. There are a number of epic things to do in Pokhara, especially for those chasing adrenalin, with white water rafting and some of the best paragliding on earth all available here.  From this lakeside town, there are majestic views of 8,000 meter-high snow-capped giants of the Annapurna range, awe-inspiring in their size and stature. On a clear day, they can be seen from everywhere in Pokhara like watchful guardians over the sleepy town. We can actually head to the lakeside early in the morning to breathe in the calm morning air and admire the towering peaks rising amongst the clouds in the distance.

This itinerary is a guideline only and we will follow the itinerary as far as possible but due to weather conditions, health conditions, natural disasters and other unfavorable phenomenon your guide might decide to amend or skip the itinerary for your own safety. Your guide will help you at any time with providing information regarding conditions and safety during the treks.

Upon your arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, one of our team representatives will be at the airport to pick you up, and he will then take you to your hotel. 

  1. Kathmandu Durbar Square:
  2. Swayambhunath:
  3. Boudhanath:
  4. Pashupatinath:
  • Welcome dinner in the evening hosted in your honor by the Asian Heritage team

Read more:

a) Kathmandu Durbar Square:

Kathmandu’s Durbar Sq was where the city’s kings were once crowned and legitimized, and from where they ruled (Durbar means palace). As such, the square remains the traditional heart of the old town and Kathmandu’s most spectacular legacy of traditional architecture. The square bore the brunt of Kathmandu's 2015 earthquake damage. Half a dozen temples collapsed, as did several towers in the Hanuman Dhoka palace complex, but it's still a fabulous complex. Reconstruction will continue for years.

Although most of the square dates from the 17th and 18th centuries (many of the original buildings are much older), a great deal of rebuilding happened after the great earthquake of 1934. The entire square was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1979.

The Durbar Sq area is actually made up of three loosely linked squares. To the south is the open Basantapur Sq area, a former royal elephant stables that now houses souvenir stalls and off which runs Freak St. The main Durbar Sq area is to the west. Running northeast is the second part of Durbar Sq, which contains the entrance to the Hanuman Dhoka and an assortment of temples. From this open area Makhan Tole, at one time the main road in Kathmandu and still the most interesting street to walk down, continues northeast.

b)            Swayambhunath:

The Swayambhunath Stupa is one of the crowning glories of Kathmandu Valley architecture. This perfectly proportioned monument rises through a whitewashed dome to a gilded spire, from where four iconic faces of the Buddha stare out across the valley in the cardinal directions. The site was shaken severely by the 2015 earthquake, but the main stupa sustained only superficial damage. The entire structure of the stupa is deeply symbolic: the white dome represents the earth, while the 13-tiered, tower-like structure at the top symbolizes the 13 stages of nirvana. The nose-like squiggle below the piercing eyes is actually the Nepali number Ek (one), signifying unity, and above is a third eye signifying the all-seeing insight of the Buddha.

The base of the central stupa is ringed by prayer wheels embossed with the sacred mantra om mani Padme hum (‘hail to the jewel in the lotus).

Pilgrims circuiting the stupa spin each one as they pass by. Fluttering above the stupa are thousands of prayer flags, with similar mantras, which are said to be carried to heaven by the Wind Horse. Set on ornate plinths around the base of the stupa are statues representing the five Dhyani Buddhas – Vairocana, Ratnasambhava, Amitabha, Amoghasiddhi, and Aksobhya – and their consorts. These deities represent the five qualities of Buddhist wisdom.

A journey up to the Buddhist temple and Unesco World Heritage Site of Swayambhunath is one of the definitive experiences of Kathmandu. Mobbed by monkeys and soaring above the city on a lofty hilltop, the ‘Monkey Temple’ is a fascinating jumble of Buddhist and Hindu iconography. Even the 2015 earthquake failed to topple Kathmandu's best-loved temple, though a couple of outlying buildings crumbled in the tremor.

The compound is centered on the gleaming white stupa, topped by a gilded spire painted with the eyes of the Buddha. Depictions of these eyes appear all over the Kathmandu Valley. The atmosphere is heightened in the morning and evening by local devotees who make a ritual circumnavigation of the stupa, spinning the prayer wheels set into its base. It is also a great place to watch the sunset over Kathmandu.

c)            Boudhanath:

The first stupa at Boudhanath was built sometime after AD 600, when the Tibetan king, Songtsen Gampo, converted to Buddhism. In terms of grace and purity of line, no other stupa in Nepal comes close to Boudhanath. From its whitewashed dome to its gilded tower painted with the all-seeing eyes of the Buddha, the monument is perfectly proportioned. Join the Tibetan pilgrims on their morning and evening koras (circumambulations) for the best atmosphere. According to legend, the king constructed the stupa as an act of penance after unwittingly killing his father. The first stupa was wrecked by Mughal invaders in the 14th century, so the current stupa is a more recent construction. The highly symbolic construction serves in essence as a three-dimensional reminder of the Buddha’s path towards enlightenment. The plinth represents earth, the Kumbha (dome) is water, the harmika (square tower) is fire, the spire is air and the umbrella at the top is the void or ether beyond space. The 13 levels of the spire represent the stages that a human being must pass through to achieve nirvana.

Stupas were originally built to house holy relics and some claim that Boudhanath contains the relics of the past Buddha, Kashyapa, while others say it contains a piece of bone from the skeleton of Siddhartha Gautama, the historical Buddha. Around the base of the stupa are 108 small images of the Dhyani Buddha Amitabha (108 is an auspicious number in Tibetan culture) and a ring of prayer wheels, set in groups of four or five into 147 niches.

To reach the upper level of the plinth, look for the gateway at the north end of the stupa, beside a small shrine dedicated to Hariti (Ajima), the goddess of smallpox. The plinth is open from 5 am to 6 pm (till 7 pm in summer), offering a raised viewpoint over the tide of pilgrims surging around the stupa. Note the committed devotees prostrating themselves full-length on the ground in the courtyard on the east side of the stupa.

d)            Pashupatinath:

Nepal’s most important Hindu temple stands on the banks of the holy Bagmati River, surrounded by a bustling market of religious stalls selling marigolds, prasad (offerings), incense, rudraksha beads, conch shells, pictures of Hindu deities and temples, tika powder in rainbow colors, glass lingams, models of Mt Meru and other essential pilgrim paraphernalia.

At first glance, Pashupatinath might not look that sacred – the temple is just a few hundred meters from the end of the runway at Tribhuvan Airport, overlooking a particularly polluted stretch of the Bagmati. However, in religious terms, this is a powerhouse of Hindu spiritual energy and is closely connected to Shiva in the form of Pashupati, the Lord of Animals. Some surrounding minor shrines were damaged in the 2015 earthquake, but the main mandir (temple) was unscathed.

After touring Pashupatinath we will then return back to the hotel and refresh ourselves before heading for a welcome dinner in the evening hosted in your honor by Asian Heritage Trekking.

Today, we will set off for a full day of sightseeing of Patan, Bhaktapur, and Changunarayan.

Patan:

Once a fiercely independent city-state, Patan (pah-tan) is now almost a suburb of Kathmandu, separated only by the murky Bagmati River. Many locals still call the city by its original Sanskrit name of Lalitpur (City of Beauty) or by its Newari name, Yala. Almost everyone who comes to Kathmandu also visits Patan’s spectacular Durbar Sq – even after the 2015 earthquake, this remains the finest collection of temples and palaces in the whole of Nepal.

 Another good reason to come here is to take advantage of the shops and restaurants set up to cater to the NGO workers and diplomats who live in the surrounding suburbs. Then there are Patan’s fair-trade shops, selling superior handicrafts at fair prices and channeling tourist dollars to some of the neediest people in Nepal.

The ancient royal palace of Patan faces on to magnificent Durbar Sq. This concentrated mass of temples is perhaps the most visually stunning display of Newari architecture to be seen in Nepal. Temple construction in the square went into overdrive during the Malla period (14th to 18th centuries), particularly during the reign of King Siddhinarsingh Malla (1619–60). It's well worth at least a half-day trip from Kathmandu.

Reconstruction of temples affected by the 2015 earthquake will continue for several years, so safety fencing and scaffolding are to be expected. However, all restorations are well underway and the Royal Palace housing the museum is open.

Formerly the residence of the Malla kings, the section of the Royal Palace surrounding Keshav Narayan Chowk now houses one of the finest collections of religious art in Asia. The museum is a national treasure and an invaluable introduction to the art, symbolism, and architecture of the valley. You need at least an hour, and preferably two, to do this place justice, and it’s worth taking a break at the Museum Café before diving in for another round.

The collection is displayed in a series of brick and timber rooms, linked by steep and narrow stairways. There are informative labels on each of the hundreds of statues, carvings, and votive objects, allowing you to put a name to many of the deities depicted at temples around the valley.

There are also some interesting displays on the techniques used to create these wonderful objects, including the art of repoussé and the ‘lost wax method of casting. The top floor houses some fascinating photos of Patan at the end of the 19th century.

The museum has a shop selling reproductions of some of the works displayed inside. For a sneak preview of the museum’s highlights and the story of its renovation, go to www.asianart.com/patan-museum. Photography is allowed.

The other attractions that you will visit today in Patan include Golden Temple (Kwa Bahal), Mul Chowk, Krishna Mandir, Sundari Chowk, Royal palace, Golden Gate, and Maha Boudha Temple.

Must-see attractions in Patan

  • Patan Durbar Square:

 The ancient royal palace of Patan faces on to magnificent Durbar Sq. This concentrated mass of temples is perhaps the most visually stunning display of Newari architecture to be seen in Nepal. Temple construction in the square went into overdrive during the Malla period (14th to 18th centuries), particularly during the reign of King Siddhinarsingh Malla (1619–60). It's well worth at least a half-day trip from Kathmandu.

Reconstruction of temples affected by the 2015 earthquake will continue for several years, so safety fencing and scaffolding are to be expected. However, all restorations are well underway and the Royal Palace housing the museum is open.

  • Golden Temple (Kwa Bahal):

This unique Buddhist monastery is just north of Durbar Sq. It was allegedly founded in the 12th century, and it has existed in its current form since 1409. The temple gets its name from the gilded metal plates that cover most of its frontage and it is one of the most beautiful in Patan. 

Entry is via an ornate narrow stone doorway to the east, or a wooden doorway to the west from one of the interlinked courtyards on the north side of Nakabhil.

Entering from the east, note the gaudy lions and the 1886 signature of Krishnabir, the master stonemason who sculpted the fine doorway with its frieze of Buddhist deities. This second doorway leads to the main courtyard of the Golden Temple; shoes and leather articles must be removed to enter the lower courtyard. The main priest of the temple is a young boy under the age of 12, who serves for 30 days before handing the job over to another young boy.

The temple itself is a magnificent example of courtyard temple architecture. Two elephant statues guard the doorway and the facade is covered by a host of gleaming Buddhist figures. Inside the main shrine is a beautiful statue of Sakyamuni (no photos allowed). To the left of the courtyard is a statue of Green Tara and in the right corner is a statue of the Bodhisattva Vajrasattva wearing an impressive silver-and-gold cape. Both are inside inner shrines.

Facing the main temple is a smaller shrine containing a ‘self-arisen’ (swayambhu) chaitya. The four corners of the courtyard have statues of four Lokeshvaras (incarnations of Avalokiteshvara) and four monkeys, which hold out jackfruits as an offering. A stairway leads to an upper-floor chapel dedicated to a white eight-armed Avalokiteshvara, lined with Tibetan-style frescoes including a wheel of life. Finally, as you leave the temple at the eastern exit, look up to see an embossed mandala mounted on the ceiling. Outside of winter, look for the tortoises pottering around the compound – these are the temple guardians.

It’s worth ducking south towards Durbar Sq to see the small, two-tiered Uma Maheshwar Temple and the handsome stone Gauri Shankar Temple, in the Indian shikhara style. Across the road, the Buddhist Maru Mandapa Mahavihar is set in a small courtyard.

  • Mul Chowk:

South of the Patan Museum, a gateway opens onto the stately Mul Chowk, the largest and oldest of the Royal Palace’s three main chowks (squares). The original buildings were destroyed by fire in 1662 but rebuilt just three years later by Srinivasa Malla. The temples in the courtyard were restored in 2014 and the surrounding walls and buildings were quickly restored after the 2015 earthquake.

In the center of the square is the small, gilded, central Bidyapith Temple, beside a wooden post used to secure animals for sacrifices. The central deity is Yantaju, a form of Durga, and a personal deity to the Malla kings.

On the south side of the square is the Taleju Bhawani Temple, flanked by statues of the river goddesses Ganga, on a tortoise, and Jamuna, on a Makara. The upper galleries now form part of the museum's architectural displays, with fine examples of carved wooden struts.

At the northeastern corner of the square is the tall Degutalle Temple, topped by an octagonal triple-roofed tower. The larger, triple-roofed Taleju Temple is directly north, looking out over Durbar Sq, and dedicated to Taleju, another protective deity of the Malla kings.

  • Patan Museum:

Formerly the residence of the Malla kings, the section of the Royal Palace surrounding Keshav Narayan Chowk now houses one of the finest collections of religious art in Asia. The museum is a national treasure and an invaluable introduction to the art, symbolism, and architecture of the valley. You need at least an hour, and preferably two, to do this place justice, and it’s worth taking a break at the Museum Café before diving in for another round.

The collection is displayed in a series of brick and timber rooms, linked by steep and narrow stairways. There are informative labels on each of the hundreds of statues, carvings, and votive objects, allowing you to put a name to many of the deities depicted at temples around the valley.

There are also some interesting displays on the techniques used to create these wonderful objects, including the art of repoussé and the ‘lost wax method of casting. The top floor houses some fascinating photos of Patan at the end of the 19th century. The museum has a shop selling reproductions of some of the works displayed inside.

  • Royal Palace:

Forming the entire eastern side of Durbar Sq, the Royal Palace of Patan was originally built in the 14th century and expanded during the 17th and 18th centuries by Siddhinarsingh Malla, Srinivasa Malla, and Vishnu Malla. The Patan palace predates the palaces in Kathmandu and Bhaktapur and remains one of the architectural highlights of Nepal.

 Behind the extravagant facade, with its overhanging eaves, carved windows and delicate wooden screens, are a series of connecting courtyards and a trip of temples dedicated to the valley’s main deity, the goddess Taleju. The closed external Bhairab gateway leading to the central Mul Chowk courtyard is flanked by two stone lions and colorful murals of Shiva in his wrathful incarnation as Bhairab. Strings of buffalo guts are hung above the door in his honor.

The northern courtyard is reached through the Golden Gate (Sun Dhoka). Installed in 1734, this finely engraved and gilded gateway is topped by a golden Torana showing Shiva, Parvati, Ganesh, and Kumar (an incarnation of Skanda, the god of war). Directly above the gateway is a window made from gold foil wrapped around a timber frame, where the king once made public appearances. This gateway now forms the entrance to the Patan Museum and northern ticket office.

Restoration works following the 2015 earthquake are not the first to take place at the palace. Reconstruction followed the conquest of the valley by Prithvi Narayan Shah in 1768, and again after the great earthquake of 1934.

  • Krishna Mandir:

Heading into Durbar Sq, you can’t miss the splendid Krishna Mandir built by King Siddhinarsingh Malla in 1637. Constructed from carved stone – in place of the usual brick and timber – this fabulous architectural confection shows the clear influence of Indian temple design and is the earliest stone temple of its type in Nepal. The temple stayed intact through the 2015 earthquake.

The temple consists of three tiers, fronted by columns and supporting a northern Indian–style shikhara spire. The distinctive temple is often depicted on the ornate brass butter lamps hung in Nepali homes. Non-Hindus cannot enter to view the statue of Krishna, the goatherd, but you’ll often hear temple musicians playing upstairs. Vishnu’s mount, the man-bird Garuda, kneels with folded arms on top of a column facing the temple. The delicate stone carvings along the beam on the 1st-floor recount events from the Mahabharata, while the hard-to-see beam on the 2nd floor features scenes from the Ramayana.

A major festival, Krishna Jayanta, also known as Krishnasthami, is held here in the Nepali month of Bhadra (August to September) for Krishna’s birthday.

  • Sundari Chowk:

South of Mul Chowk is the smaller Sundari Chowk, arranged around a superbly carved sunken water tank known as the Tusha Hiti. The chowk was restored in 2014, and again after the 2015 earthquake. Built-in 1647, the renovated water tank has 72 carved stone plaques depicting Tantric deities and was used by the king for ritual ablutions. The spout is new; the original was stolen in 2010 (and recovered). Ancient carved wooden struts lie scattered in the corners.

On the way outlook at the restored Bhandarkhal water tank, once the main water supply for the palace, features a charming meditation pavilion.

Back in Durbar Sq, the traditional gateway to Sundari Chowk features three magnificent statues of Hanuman (barely recognizable beneath layers of orange paint), Ganesh, and Vishnu as Narasimha, the man-lion, tearing out the entrails of a demon.

  • Golden Gate

The entry to Patan Museum is through the Royal Palace's superb Golden Gate. Installed in 1734, this finely engraved and gilded gateway is topped by a golden Torana showing Shiva, Parvati, Ganesh, and Kumar (an incarnation of Skanda, the god of war).

Directly above the gateway is a window made from gold foil wrapped around a timber frame, where the king once made public appearances.

  • Rato Machhendranath Temple:

Almost directly across the road from the Minnath Temple, down an alley, a white-columned gateway leads to the wide, open square containing the revered Rato Machhendranath Temple. Dedicated to the god of rain and plenty, the temple, like so many in Nepal, blurs the line between Buddhism and Hinduism. Buddhists regard Rato (Red) Machhendranath as an incarnation of Avalokiteshvara, while Hindus see him as an incarnation of Shiva.

Set inside a protective metal fence, the towering three-story temple dates from 1673, but there has been some kind of temple on this site since at least 1408. The temple’s four ornate doorways are guarded by stone snow lions, and at ground level on the four corners of the temple plinth are yeti-like demons known as kyah.

Mounted on freestanding pillars at the front of the temple is a curious collection of metal animals in protective cages, including a peacock, Garuda, horse, buffalo, lion, elephant, fish, and snake. Look up to see the richly painted roof struts of the temple, which show Avalokiteshvara standing above figures being tortured in hell.

The main image of Machhendranath resides here for six months a year, before moving to Bungamati during the spectacular Rato Machhendranath Festival in April/May.

  • Mahabouddha Temple:

As you step through the entryway of this hard-to-find courtyard in the southeast of Patan, the temple suddenly looms above you, crammed in like a plant straining to get some sunlight. Built-in the Indian shikhara style, the shrine takes its name from the hundreds of terracotta tiles that cover it, each bearing an image of the Buddha. The shikhara is upright, although it was cloaked in heavy-duty scaffolding when we last visited.

The temple dates from 1585 but was rebuilt after the 1934 earthquake. Unfortunately, without plans to work from, the builders ended up with a different-looking temple and had enough bricks and tiles left over to construct a smaller shrine to Maya Devi, the Buddha’s mother, in the corner of the courtyard. The temple is loosely modeled on the Mahabouddha Temple at Bodhgaya in India, where the Buddha gained enlightenment.

The surrounding lanes are full of shops selling high-quality Patan-style metal statues. The roof terrace of the shop at the back of the courtyard has a good view of the temple.

To reach the Mahabouddha Temple, you must walk southeast from Durbar Sq along Hakha Tole, passing a series of small Vaishnavite and Shaivite temples. When you reach Sundhara Tole, with its temple and sunken hiti (water tank) with three brass water spouts, turn right and look for the tiny doorway leading to the temple.

  • Kumbeshwar Temple:

 Due north of Durbar Sq is the eye-catching Kumbeshwar Temple, one of the valley’s three five-story temples. This tall, thin mandir (temple) features some particularly artistic woodcarving, and it seems to defy gravity as it towers above the surrounding houses. Amazingly, this precarious structure survived the earthquake, though the top tier toppled in May 2015 and the tower is now leaning slightly. A large Nandi statue and central lingam indicate that the shrine is sacred to Shiva.

The temple platform has two ponds whose water is said to come straight from the holy lake at Gosainkund, a weeklong trek north of the valley. Bathing in the tank at Kumbeshwar Temple is said to be as meritorious as making the arduous walk to Gosainkund.

The surrounding square is dotted with temples sacred to Bhairab and Baglamukhi (Parvati). Local women gather at the tank known as Konti Hiti to socialize, wash clothes and fill up their water jugs. Down an alley to the north of the temple is the Kumbeshwar Technical School.

From here you can detour north to see the Northern Stupa, one of four marker shrines showing the old city limits of Patan.

  • King Yoganarendra Malla’s Statue

 South of the Jagannarayan Temple is a tall column topped by a striking brass statue of King Yoganarendra Malla (r 1684–1705) and his queens. Installed in 1700, the column toppled in the 2015 earthquake but was one of the first items to be restored. Looming over the king's head is a cobra, and alighted on the head of the cobra is a small brass bird.

Legend has it that as long as the bird remains, the king may still return to his palace. Accordingly, a door and window of the palace are always kept open and a hookah pipe is kept ready. A rider to the legend adds that when the bird flies off, the elephants in front of the Vishwanath Temple will stroll over the Manga Hiti for a drink.

Behind the statue of the king are three smaller Vishnu temples, including a brick-and-plaster shikhara temple, built-in 1590 to enshrine an image of Narsingha, Vishnu’s man-lion incarnation.

  • Peace Gallery

Nepal's decade-long civil war has been marked by a photo exhibition that brings the conflict poignantly to life. Based on the book A People War by Nepali Times editor Kunda Dixit, the exhibition is on display at the Peace Gallery inside the Rato Bangla School. It's possible the exhibition will find a new home, in which case contact the Bhaktapur Tourism Development Committee for updates.

The images include portraits of schoolchildren giving the Maoist red salute, siblings who faced each other on either side of the front line, and a teacher who continued to teach despite having his hands cut off by Maoists. It's everything photojournalism should be – nuanced, moving, surprising, and never simplistic.

Enter the school, just behind Dhokaima Café, and ask for directions. The gallery is on the 4th floor of an administration building.

  • Bhimsen Temple

At the northern end of Durbar Sq, the Bhimsen Temple is dedicated to the god of trade and business, which may explain its prosperous appearance. One of the five Pandavas from the Mahabharata, Bhimsen is credited with superhuman strength – he is often depicted as a red muscleman, lifting a horse or crushing an elephant under his knee.

The three-storey pagoda has an unusual rectangular plan that sets it apart from other temples in Patan. The current temple was completely rebuilt in 1682 after a fire and was later restored after the 1934 earthquake, and again in 1967. Once repairs following the 2015 quake are complete, non-Hindus may once again be able to climb to the upper level (the inner sanctum is usually upstairs in Bhimsen temples) to view the wild-eyed statue of Bhimsen.

  • Uku Bahal  or the Rudra Varna Mahavihar:

 Located south of Patan Durbar Square, the Rudra Varna Mahavihar (Uku Bahal) Newar Buddhist Monastery is known locally as Rudra Varna Mahavihar. One of several popular attractions of culture worth stopping by to see in Patan city. The area around Rudra Varna Mahavihar contains 3 courtyards and each has interesting and unique features. The highlight is, of course, the main Uku Bahal central courtyard which was started by King Shivadev (590-604) as one of five monasteries.

The outer courtyard is marked by an impressive gate with two flag-bearing lion statues on top that wouldn’t look out of place in London. These were a later addition in 1680. The courtyard at the back of Rudra Varna Mahavihar is relatively modern and belongs to the residents surrounding it. Nonetheless, it’s worth taking a walk around it and possibly admitting some of the painted sculptures and stupa there.

  • Minnath Temple

Just 200m south of I Baha Bahi, a large water tank marks the entrance to a courtyard strewn with wooden beams. In the center is the brightly painted, two-tiered Minnath Temple, dedicated to the Bodhisattva Jatadhari Lokesvara, who is considered to be the little brother of Rato Machhendranath. The temple was founded in the Licchavi period (3rd to 9th centuries), but the multi-armed goddesses on the roof struts were added much later.

Note the metal pots and pans nailed to the temple rafters by devotees. The timbers surrounding the temple are assembled into a chariot every year to haul the statue of Minnath around town as part of the Rato Machhendranath Festival.

  • Vishwanath Temple

 South of the Bhimsen Temple stands the Vishwanath Temple, dedicated to Shiva. This elaborately decorated two-tiered pagoda was built in 1627 and it features some particularly ornate woodcarving, especially on the Torana (lintel) above the colonnade.

On the west side is a statue of Shiva’s loyal mount, Nandi the bull, while the east side features two stone elephants with mahouts, one elephant crushing a man beneath its foot. When the doors are open, you can view the enormous lingam inside.

  • Manga Hiti

Immediately across from Bhimsen Temple is the sunken Manga Hiti, one of the water conduits with which Patan is liberally endowed. The tank contains a cruciform-shaped pool and three wonderfully carved Dhara (water spouts) in the shape of Makara (mythical crocodile-like beasts). The two wooden ceremonial pavilions that overlook the tank – known as the Mani Mandap – collapsed in the 2015 earthquake and are under repair.

  • Hari Shankar Temple

 This temple is dedicated to Hari Shankar, a curious hybrid deity that has half the attributes of Vishnu and half the attributes of Shiva. Although it collapsed in the 2015 earthquake, restoration of this three-storey temple is underway using recovered materials, including the roof struts carved with scenes of the tortures of the damned. The original temple was built in 1704–05 by the daughter of King Yoganarendra Malla.

  • Tusha Hiti

The highlight of Sundari Chowk is the superbly carved sunken water tank known as the Tusha Hiti. Built-in 1647, the renovated tank has 72 carved stone plaques depicting Tantric deities and was used by the king for ritual ablutions. The spout is new; the original was stolen in 2010 but recently recovered. Ancient carved wooden struts lie neglected in the corners like kindling wood.

Bhaktapur:

The third of the medieval city-states in the Kathmandu Valley, Bhaktapur was always described as the best-preserved. Tragically, however, the 2015 earthquake caused terrible devastation and loss of life. Nevertheless, only a few temples were destroyed, there is still much to see here and tourism is vital to the community.

Many Nepalis use the old name of Bhadgaon (pronounced bud-gown) or the Newari name Khwopa, which means City of Devotees. The name fits – Bhaktapur has three major squares full of towering temples that comprise some of the finest religious architecture in the country.

Cultural life is also proudly on display. Along narrow alleys, artisans weave cloth and chisel timber, squares are filled with drying pots, and locals gather in courtyards to bathe, collect water, play cards and socialize. To view this tapestry of Nepali life, visitors must pay a town entry fee, which helps fund temple repair and maintenance.

One of the most fascinating and important World Heritage Sites in Nepal, Bhaktapur is made up of three large squares filled with historic shrines and temples, Newar architecture, and fine art. Famous for its clay pots and exquisite wood carvings, Bhaktapur is also legendary for its colorful festivals and its delicious and unique cuisine. Bhaktapur retains its medieval feel and the local people are still engaged in farming and traditional crafts like pottery, metalwork, art, and woodwork which have supported the city since it was established in the 12th century. You see the magnificent Golden Gate in Durbar Square (square of the palaces), the Palace of 55 Windows, the Nyota Pola Temple, Newar houses, and pottery square. 

Must-see attractions in Bhaktapur

  • The Golden Gate:

The magnificent Golden Gate is a visual highlight of Durbar Sq. Set into a bright red gatehouse surrounded by white palace walls, the fabulous golden portal boasts some of Nepal's finest repoussé metalwork. The gilded Torana features a fabulous Garuda wrestling with a number of supernatural serpents, while below is a four-headed and 10-armed figure of the goddess Taleju Bhawani, the family deity of the Malla kings.

 Construction of the gate began during the reign of King Bhupatindra Malla (r 1696–1722), and the project was completed by his successor, Jaya Ranjit Malla, in 1754. The death of Jaya Ranjit Malla marked the end of the Malla dynasty and the end of the golden age of Newari architecture in Nepal.

The gate opens to the inner courtyards of the Royal Palace, a once vast compound until the 1934 earthquake leveled all but a handful of its 99 courtyards. More walls toppled during the 2015 earthquake. To the right of the Golden Gate is the 55 Window Palace, which, you guessed it, has 55 intricate wooden windows stretching along with its upper level.

As you enter the palace complex, hidden behind grills in the darkness on either side of the inner gate is a pair of enormous war drums, which were used to rouse the city in the event of an attack. From here you’ll pass the two statues of traditionally dressed guards standing on either side of an ornate door, brought here from Rajasthan.

Continuing on you’ll reach the main entrance to Mul Chowk, the oldest part of the palace and the site of Taleju Temple, built-in 1553. Damaged in the quake but not destroyed, it is one of the most sacred temples in Bhaktapur. Only Hindus can enter, but you can peer in and admire its entrance, which is fronted by magnificent woodcarvings. Photography is prohibited.

Continuing on around the corner from Mul Chowk is the Naga Pokhari, a 17th-century water tank used for the ritual immersion of the idol of Taleju. The pool is encircled by a writhing stone cobra and other serpents rise up in the middle and at the end of the tank, where water pours from a magnificent Dhara (spout) in the form of a goat being eaten by a Makara.

  • Nyatapola Temple

You should be able to see the sky-high rooftop of the Nyatapola Temple long before you reach Taumadhi Tole. With five storeys towering 30m above the square, this is the tallest temple in all of Nepal and one of the tallest buildings in the Kathmandu Valley. This perfectly proportioned temple was built in 1702 during the reign of King Bhupatindra Malla, and the construction was so sturdy that the 1934 and 2015 earthquakes caused only minor damage.

The temple is reached by a stairway flanked by stone figures of the temple guardians. At the bottom are the legendary Rajput wrestlers Jayamel and Phattu, depicted kneeling with hefty maces. Subsequent levels are guarded by elephants with floral saddles, lions adorned with bells, beaked griffons with rams’ horns, and finally two goddesses – Baghini and Singhini. Each figure is said to be 10 times as strong as the figure on the level below.

The temple is dedicated to Siddhi Lakshmi, a bloodthirsty incarnation of the goddess Durga (Parvati). The idol of the goddess is so fearsome that only the temple’s priests are allowed to enter the inner sanctum, but less brutal incarnations of the goddess appear on the Torana above the door, beneath a canopy of braided snakes, and also on the temple’s 180 carved roof struts. In a classic piece of religious crossover, the Buddhist eight lucky signs are carved beside the temple doorways.

Look for the chariot runners piled up on the north side of the temple.

  • Potters’ Square

Hidden down shop-lined alleyways leading south from the curving road to Taumadhi Tole, Potters’ Sq is exactly what you would expect – a public square full of potter's wheels and rows of clay pots drying in the sun. Nearby buildings were damaged by the 2015 earthquake, but life – and pottery – in the square continues.

This is the center of Bhaktapur’s ceramic industry, and it’s a fascinating place to wander around. Several shops sell the finished article, and you can see the firing process at the back of the square, which is lined with mud-covered straw kilns.

On the northern side of the square, a small hillock is topped by a shady pipal tree and a Ganesh shrine, surrounded by piles of straw for the pottery kilns. In the square itself is a solid-brick Vishnu Temple, which was constructed from remnants of temples destroyed in the 1934 quake, and the double-roofed Jeth Ganesh Temple, whose priest is chosen from the Kumal (potters’) caste. During the harvest in October, every square inch that is not covered by pots is covered by drying rice.

  • Bhairabnath Temple

The broad-fronted, triple-roofed Bhairabnath Temple is dedicated to Bhairab, the fearsome incarnation of Shiva, whose consort occupies the Nyatapola Temple across the square. Despite Bhairab’s fearsome powers and his massive temple, the deity is depicted here as a disembodied head just 15cm high! Casually stacked against the north wall of the temple are the enormous wheels and runners from the chariot used to haul the image of Bhairab around town during the Bisket Jatra festival in mid-April.

The first temple on this site was a modest structure built in the early 17th century, but King Bhupatindra Malla added an extra storey in 1717, and a third level was added when the temple was rebuilt after the 1934 earthquake. The final version of the temple has a similar rectangular plan to the Bhimsen Temple in Patan’s Durbar Sq.

A small hole in the temple's central door (below a row of carved boar snouts) is used to push offerings into the temple’s interior; prior to the 2015 earthquake, priests accessed the interior through the small Betal Temple, on the south side of the main pagoda, but this collapsed entirely, and restoration work is underway.

The temple’s facade is guarded by two brass lions holding the Nepali flag, the only national flag that is not rectangular or square. To the right of the door is an image of Bhairab painted on the rattan, decorated with a gruesome garland of buffalo guts. Head here at dusk to hear traditional devotional music.

Next to the temple is a sunken hiti with a particularly fine spout in the form of a Makara (mythical crocodile-like beast).

  • National Art Gallery

The western end of Bhaktapur's Royal Palace contains the best of the three museums in Bhaktapur. Inside, you can view an extensive collection of Tantric cloth paintings – the Hindu version of Buddhist thangkas – as well as palm-leaf manuscripts, and metal, stone, and wooden votive objects, some of which date from the 12th century. Keep hold of your ticket as this also covers the Woodcarving Museum and Brass & Bronze Museum in Tachupal Tole.

The entrance to the gallery is flanked by two huge guardian lions, one male, and one female. Besides the lions are some imposing 17th-century statues of Hanuman the monkey god, in his four-armed Tantric form, and Vishnu, as the gut-ripping Narsingha.

Inside the gallery are portraits of all the Shah kings, including a surly Gyanendra (the last of the Nepali kings) following the abolition of the monarchy in 2008. In the first gallery lookout for depictions of the nightmarish Maha Sambhar, with 21 faces and an unbelievable number of arms, and then turn around on the spot for scenes from the Kama Sutra.

  • Char Dham Temples

Standing at the western end of Durbar Sq, the four Char Dham temples were constructed to provide spiritual merit for pilgrims who were unable to make the journey to the Indian state of Uttaranchal to visit its famed Char Dham temples. After the 2015 earthquake, only three remained. The shikhara-style Kedarnath Temple, dedicated to Shiva, was shaken apart by the tremor but was actively under reconstruction when we last visited.

Although damaged, the three remaining temples are still worth visiting. The two-roofed Gopi Nath Temple (also called Jagarnath) features different incarnations of Vishnu on the ceiling struts and a statue of Garuda on the pillar at the entrance.

The small Rameshwar Temple, topped by an ornate dome, is still standing on its four repaired but cracked pillars. The Badrinath Temple is sacred to Vishnu in his incarnation as Narayan.

  • Dattatreya Temple

At the east end of Tachupal Tole, the eye-catching Dattatreya Temple was originally built in 1427, supposedly using timber from a single tree. The slightly mismatched front porch was added later. The temple is dedicated to Dattatreya, a curious hybrid deity, blending elements of Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva. Judging from the Garuda statue and the conch and chakra disc mounted on pillars supported by stone turtles in front of the temple, Vishnu seems to have come out on top.

The three-storey temple is raised above the ground on a brick and terracotta base, which is carved with erotic scenes, including unexpected humor where one bored-looking woman multitasks by washing her hair while being pleasured by her husband. The main steps to the temple are guarded by statues of the same two Malla wrestlers who watch over the first plinth of the Nyatapola Temple.

  • Taleju Bell

In front of what once was the Vatsala Durga Temple is a large bell, which was erected by King Jaya Ranjit Malla in 1737 to mark morning and evening prayers at the Taleju Temple.

A smaller bell on the plinth of the Vatsala Durga Temple was known as the ‘barking bell’. According to legend, it was erected by King Bhupatindra Malla in 1721 to counteract a vision he had in a dream, and dogs were said to bark and whine when the bell was rung. Unfortunately, it was damaged when the temple collapsed in 2015 and it now sits forlornly in a corner of the entrance to Mul Chowk.

Behind the bell, the pavilion is an ornate sunken hiti containing a fine stone Dhara in the form of a Makara, topped by a crocodile and a frog – the only part of the famous Vatsala Durga Temple to survive the 2015 earthquake.

  • Ugrachandi & Bhairab Statues

As you enter Durbar Sq through the western gate, look left to a gateway flanked by two stocky stone lions, erected by King Bhupatindra Malla in 1701. On either side are statues of the terrible Bhairab (right), the rending, sundering incarnation of Shiva, and his consort on the left side, the equally terrible Ugrachandi (Durga). It is said that the unfortunate sculptor had his hands cut off afterward, to prevent him from duplicating his masterpieces.

Ugrachandi has 18 arms holding various Tantric weapons symbolizing the multiple aspects of her character. She is depicted casually killing a demon with a trident to symbolize the victory of wisdom over ignorance. Bhairab gets by with just 12 arms, one holding two heads impaled on a trident and another holding a cup made from a human skull. The statues originally guarded a courtyard that was destroyed in the 1934 quake.

  • Til Mahadev Narayan Temple

This interesting temple at Taumadhi Tole has hidden away behind the buildings at the south end of the square. The Til Mahadev Narayan Temple is set in an untidy courtyard, but this is actually an important place of pilgrimage and one of the oldest temples in the city. An inscription states that the site has been in use since 1080 and that the image of Til Mahadev was installed here in 1170.

 The double-tiered temple is fronted by an elegant kneeling Garuda statue on a pillar and two columns bearing the sacred sankha and chakra symbols of Vishnu. In case Shiva was feeling left out, a lingam symbol on a yoni base (the Shaivite symbol for the male and female genitals) stands behind a wooden grill in front and to one side of the temple. A plaque to the right of the door depicts the Buddhist deity Vajrayogini in a characteristic pose with her left leg high in the air.

  • Khalna Tole

Southeast of Potters' Sq and above the river is the wide-open square of Khalna Tole, the setting for the spectacular Bisket Jatra festival. Many flanking houses were damaged in the 2015 earthquake, but restoration work is underway. In the middle of the square, note the huge stone yoni where the giant lingam is erected during the festival. You may have to pick your way through mountains of drying rice and grain to get here.

Just south of the bridge, past an orange Hanuman statue on the riverbank is the campus of the Kathmandu University Department of Music, where the sound of traditional music wafts over the peaceful ornamental gardens. Across the river are the modern cremation plinths at Chuping Ghat.

  • Pujari Math

Tachupal Tole is flanked by a series of ornate brick-and-timber buildings that were originally used as math (Hindu priests’ houses). The best known is the Pujari Math, which now serves as the Woodcarving Museum. The building was damaged in the 2015 earthquake, but its most famous feature – the superb 15th-century Peacock Window, widely regarded as the finest carved window in the Kathmandu Valley – is intact.

 The building was first constructed in the 15th century during the reign of King Yaksha Malla but rebuilt in 1763. German experts renovated the building in 1979 as a wedding gift for the then King Birendra. Many surrounding shops sell miniature wooden copies of the Peacock Window as souvenirs.

  • Suriya Binayak Temple:

South of Bhaktapur, on the south side of the Arniko Hwy, Suriya Binayak is an important Ganesh temple dating back to the 17th century. The white shikhara-style temple contains some interesting statuary, but the main attractions are the peaceful setting and the walk uphill above the temple to a hillside with sweeping views over Bhaktapur. The temple is flanked by statues of Malla kings and a large statue of Ganesh’s vehicle, the rat.

To get here, take the road south from Potters’ Sq to Ram Ghat (where there are areas for ritual bathing and cremations) and cross the river to the Arniko Hwy. On the other side, it’s a 1km walk along the road to the start of the steps to the temple. Bank on around 30 minutes from Taumadhi Tole.

  • Tadhunchen Bahal

Walking east from Durbar Sq, you’ll pass the gateway to the restored Tadhunchen Bahal monastery, tucked between souvenir shops. This Buddhist temple is linked to the cult of the Kumari, Bhaktapur’s living goddess. Bhaktapur actually has three Kumaris, but they lack the political importance of Kathmandu.

In the inner courtyard, the roof struts on the eastern side have unusual carvings that show the tortures of the damned. In one, a snake is wrapped around a man, another shows two rams butting an unfortunate’s head, while a third strut shows a nasty tooth extraction being performed with a large pair of pliers!

  • Hanuman Ghat

 This impressive collection of chaitya, Shiva statues, Shaivite shrines, and lingam in the town's southeast includes what could well be the two largest Shiva lingam (in equally large yoni) in Nepal. The site was damaged in the 2015 quake, but most structures are still standing. Through the archway are more statues beside the stinking confluence of rivers at Hanuman Ghat. Note the exquisitely carved images of Ganesh, Sakyamuni, Ram and Sita, Hanuman and Vishnu/Narayan, reclining on a bed of snakes. Hindu yogis often come here to meditate.

  • King Bhupatindra Malla’s Column

With hands folded in a prayer position, the bronze statue of King Bhupatindra Malla sits atop a column in front of the Vatsala Durga Temple. The statue was created in 1699 and similar statues were erected in the Durbar Sqs of Kathmandu and Patan. Both of the latter collapsed in 2015; Patan's was restored, but Kathmandu's was awaiting restoration at the time of research. Bhupatindra was the best known of the Malla kings of Bhaktapur and contributed to much of the architecture in town.

  • Chyasilin Mandap

'Chyasilin' refers to the eight-cornered roof of this pavilion. It was rebuilt in 1990 using old photos and paintings and components from the original building, which was destroyed in the 1934 earthquake. With modern steel-frame technology underpinning it, it survived the 2015 earthquake. The original was used to receive royal guests, the upper floor used as a viewing platform during festivals, and at least once it was the venue of a poetry competition.

  • Brass & Bronze Museum:

Directly across from the Woodcarving Museum, in another old math (Hindu priest’s house) with similar lighting problems, this museum has some excellent examples of traditional metalwork, including ceremonial lamps and ritual vessels from around the valley. Hold on to your ticket to avoid paying for entry to the Woodcarving Museum and National Art Gallery.

  • Woodcarving Museum

This museum has some fine examples of Bhaktapur woodcarving displayed in dark, creaky rooms. There isn’t enough light to justify paying the camera fee, but it’s worth a visit, not least for the extravagantly carved windows in the inner courtyard. The same ticket covers entry to the nearby Brass & Bronze Museum and the National Art Gallery.

  • Pashupatinath Temple

Behind the Vatsala Durga Temple, the Pashupatinath Temple is dedicated to Shiva as Pashupati and is a replica of the main shrine at Pashupatinath. Originally built by King Yaksha Malla in 1475 (or 1482), it is the oldest temple in Durbar Sq. Like many temples, the roof struts feature erotic images, but what exactly the dwarf is doing with that bowl takes things to a new level.

After Bhaktapur sightseeing we will then move on to Changunarayana:

Changunarayana:

This temple is said to be the oldest Hindu temple still in use in the Kathmandu Valley. Built in the two-tiered pagoda style, the main shrine here is guarded on all sides by pairs of real and mythical beasts – elephants, lions, winged lions, and ram-horned griffons – and its roof struts feature some amazingly intricate carvings of Tantric deities. Changu Narayan and its associated buildings were badly affected by the 2015 earthquake however; restoration of the complex is underway.

The statue inside shows Vishnu as Narayan, the creator of all life, but the beautifully decorated metal-plate doors are only opened for rituals and only Hindus may enter.

The Garuda figure facing the west door is said to date from the 5th century, and in front of this statue is the oldest stone inscription in the valley, dating from AD 464, which recalls how the king persuaded his mother not to commit Sati (ritual suicide) after his father’s death. Two large pillars carry a conch and chakra disc, the traditional symbols of Vishnu.

Dotted around the courtyard are a series of extraordinary carvings dating from the Licchavi era, showing Vishnu in his various avatars (incarnations). Vishnu appears in the southwest corner of the compound as Narsingha (his man-lion incarnation), disemboweling a demon with his fingers, and as Vikrantha (Vamana), the six-armed dwarf who transformed himself into a giant capable of crossing the universe in three steps to defeat King Bali (look for his outstretched leg).

To the side of these images is a broken slab showing a 10-headed and 10-armed Vishnu, with Ananta reclining on a serpent below. The plaque is divided into three sections – the underworld, the world of man, and the heavens. In the northwest corner of the compound is an exquisite 7th-century image of Vishnu astride Garuda, which is illustrated on the Rs 10 banknote.

The squat temple in the southeast corner of the complex is dedicated to the Tantric goddess Chhinnamasta, who beheaded herself to feed the bloodthirsty deities Dakini and Varnini.

After completing the Changunarayan tour we will then return back to Kathmandu.

After a leisurely breakfast in the Kathmandu hotel, we will then drive to Pokhara and check in at the hotel.

Upon arrival in Pokhara, check-in at the hotel and have a rest. Later in the afternoon, you can go to stroll around the lakeside street of Pokhara and to the bank of Phewa Lake.

Today, you will start with an early drive to Sarangkot to capture the tranquil and magical view of the city before sunrise. You will view the first rays of sunlight hitting the mountains in the background. Sarangkot offers panoramic views of the Annapurna, Fishtail, Dhaulagiri, and other mountains.

After Sarankot, we will return to the hotel for some rest and will set off for full-day sightseeing in this beautiful lakeside town. You will be visiting the World Peace Stupa which is almost an hour far away from Pokhara and lies on the top of the hill. After reaching over there, you will get to see the spectacular panoramic views of the mountains to your north and west. Annapurna, Nilgiri, Glacier dome, Fishtail Mountain, and the Dhaulagiri mountain ranges can be seen from this place. After enjoying this view, you will hike down around 40-60 minutes to the bank of Phewa Lake.

Enjoy the boating to have a sight excursion to the BarahiTemple, which is situated at the center of Phewa Lake. Then you will visit Devi's fall, Gupteswor cave, Seti George, Mahendra cave, Mountain museum, and the Tibetan Refugee camp. After completing your sightseeing get back to the hotel and have a rest.

On this day you will have a scenic drive back to Kathmandu, starting from Pokhara after breakfast. Upon arrival at Kathmandu, you will be then transferred to your respective hotel and have a rest. In the evening, you can stroll around the downtown area in Thamel.

Approximately 3 hours before the departure of your flight, you will be transferred to Kathmandu international airport where we guide you to the check-in hall. From here we hope you had an amazing journey through our country, Nepal. And we hope to see you again.

Includes

  • All ground transfers by private AC vehicle including airport pickup and drop
  • 3 nights of hotel accommodations at hotel Yatri Suites and Spa or similar in Kathmandu on a twin sharing basis including breakfast and  all taxes
  • Kathmandu, Patan, Bhaktapur and Changunarayan, Pokhara, Sarangkot sightseeing with an English-speaking guide as per the above itinerary including all applicable entrance fees, private AC transfer vehicle, guide and driver's wages, etc.
  • Hotel Kuti Resort in Pokhara on a twin sharing basis including breakfast and all taxes.
  • Complimentary welcome or farewell dinner in Kathmandu at a cultural restaurant [optional]
  • ​​​​​​​


Excludes

Includes

  • All ground transfers by private AC vehicle including airport pickup and drop
  • 3 nights of hotel accommodations at hotel Yatri Suites and Spa or similar in Kathmandu on a twin sharing basis including breakfast and  all taxes
  • Kathmandu, Patan, Bhaktapur and Changunarayan, Pokhara, Sarangkot sightseeing with an English-speaking guide as per the above itinerary including all applicable entrance fees, private AC transfer vehicle, guide and driver's wages, etc.
  • Hotel Kuti Resort in Pokhara on a twin sharing basis including breakfast and all taxes.
  • Complimentary welcome or farewell dinner in Kathmandu at a cultural restaurant [optional]
  • ​​​​​​​


Excludes

  • Food, Drinks, and Beverage bills for you.
  • International airfare, Nepal visa fees (two passport photographs), travel and medical insurance, and emergency evacuation if required.
  • Personal nature expenses (bars and beverage bills, drinking water, bottled drinks, hot shower, telephone, laundry, titbits, etc.)
  • Costs arising from natural calamities, mishaps, or anything beyond our control (Costs are not refundable and transferable by any means if you leave the tour voluntarily and want to return from the tour early.
  • Any other services not mentioned in the inclusion section.

Budget Package

Standard Package

Deluxe Package

To enhance your experience in Nepal, we give you the possibility to add one or more extra activities to this travel package. The step of adding these is available in the "Book now" process.

Do not hesitate to check each extra activity. They can be booked also separately.

Kanchenjunga Basecamp Trek Bungee Jump in The Last Resort Canyoning Cooking Workshop in Kathmandu Golf Tour Everest Heli Tour Mountain Flight Paragliding in Pokhara Rafting/Kayaking in Trishuli Rickshaw ride at Kathmandu Skydiving Zipline at Pokhara Ultralight flight at Pokhara Heli tour in Nepal

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Kathmandu, Nepal

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